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Encryption

Encryption In cryptography, encryption is the process of transforming information (referred to as plaintext) using an algorithm (called cipher) to make it unreadable to anyone except those possessing special knowledge, usually referred to as a key. The result of the process is encrypted information (in cryptography, referred to as ciphertext). In many contexts, the word encryption also implicitly refers to the reverse process, decryption (e.g. “software for encryption” can typically also perform decryption), to make the encrypted information readable again (i.e. to make it unencrypted).

Encryption has long been used by militaries and governments to facilitate secret communication. Encryption is now used in protecting information within many kinds of civilian systems, such as computers, networks (e.g. the Internet e-commerce), mobile telephones, wireless microphones, wireless intercom systems, Bluetooth devices and bank automatic teller machines. Encryption is also used in digital rights management to restrict the use of copyrighted material and in software copy protection to protect against reverse engineering and software piracy. Encryption, by itself, can protect the confidentiality of messages, but other techniques are still needed to verify the integrity and authenticity of a message; for example, a message authentication code (MAC) or digital signatures. Standards and cryptographic software and hardware to perform encryption are widely available, but successfully using encryption to ensure security is a challenging problem.

A single slip-up in system design or execution can allow successful attacks. Sometimes an adversary can obtain unencrypted information without directly undoing the encryption. See traffic analysis, TEMPEST Copy protection, also known as copy prevention or copy restriction, is a kind of hardware or storage media oriented method for technologically preventing unauthorized reproduction of copyrighted software, movies, music, and other media1. In the absence of copy protection, media are easy to copy in their entirety using a machine (as opposed to photocopying each page of a book). This results in a situation where consumers can easily make copies of the items to give to their friends, a practice known as "casual copying". This practice reduces the number of people in the market who lack the product. Copy protection is most commonly found on videotapes, DVDs, computer software discs, video game discs and cartridges, and more recently, some audio CDs. Companies that choose to publish works under copy protection do so because they believe that the added expense of implementing the copy protection will be offset by even greater increases in revenue by creating a greater scarcity of casually copied media. Opponents of copy protection argue that people who obtain free copies only use what they can get for free, and would not purchase their own copy if they were unable to obtain a free copy.

Some even argue that it increases profit; people who receive a free copy of a music CD may then go and buy more of that band's music, which they would not have done otherwise. Some publishers have avoided copy-protecting their products, on the theory that the resulting inconvenience to their users outweighs any benefit of frustrating "casual copying". No formal studies have been conducted which demonstrate the truth or falsehood of this belief. The term copy protection refers to the technology used to attempt to frustrate copying, and not to the legal remedies available to publishers or authors whose copyrights are violated. Software usage models evolve beyond node locking to floating licenses (where up to N licenses can be concurrently used across an enterprise), grid computing (where multiple computers function as one unit and so use a common license) and electronic licensing (where features can be purchased and activated online). The term license management refers to broad platforms which enable the specification, enforcement and tracking of software licenses. To safeguard copy protection and license management technologies themselves against tampering and hacking, software anti-tamper methods are used. ***Information Taken from Wikepida.com

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Our vision is to establish a Global Network that services our customers and create an environment that values employees who love their work and what they do for iMastercopy. We strive to service all with excellence Started as a service that provided optical and duplication service in “24 Hour” we still honor that although the name has changed to iMasterCopy.

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To Become the medium one-stop location, with a branded name is “offices” that services Businesses, Musician and Film Makers that requires our services, but find it difficult to find the right service provider that focuses on customer services. Mastercopy stays updated with new technology that helps our client achieve their missions.  Services include Marketing and Promotions, Media Services, Disc Duplication, IT/Web services, Printing and Music/Book/App Promotions. Always looking for great partnerships, contact us if you're interested.